Blog

Fully Renovated Midcentury Modern Designed by Paul Rudolph Available for $4.9M

A rare Paul Rudolph-designed home located in Larchmont, NY, is on the market. Initially available in July for $6.4 million, the property’s price has since dropped to $4.9 million.

The current owner purchased the midcentury modern design in 2010 for $2.1 million. At the time, the 1950s-era residence hadn’t been updated in decades, and was in dire need of a revamp. 

A multimillion-dollar gut renovation, which took eight years, was recently completed. The pristine place on 2.49 acres now offers “21st-century, brand-new living in an original midcentury compound,” as the home’s website describes it. 

Gorgeous grounds feature an outdoor pool and poolhouse, as well as a guest apartment. Luxe amenities inside include an indoor pool, a wet and dry sauna, media room, gym, and multiple workspaces. 

The spectacular space also features walls of windows, sleek lines, and a wide open living area, as the original floor plan had dictated.

“It is an incredible renovation, with the highest-caliber materials,” says the listing agent, Katie Becker McLoughlin with Houlihan Lawrence.

After its initial construction, the home was redone by Rudolph himself some three decades later.

To bring the home into the 21st century, no space was untouched. But the recent renovations still reflect Rudolph’s original vision, with vast glass walls, a sunken living room, and floating stairs.

Paul Rudolph-designed home in Larchmont, NY
Paul Rudolph-designed home in Larchmont, NY

Filip Michalowski

Sunken living room with walls of windows
Sunken living room with walls of windows

Filip Michalowski

Office and gym
Office and gym

Filip Michalowski

Master bedroom
Master bedroom

Filip Michalowski

Jetted tub in master bathroom
Jetted tub in master bathroom

Filip Michalowski

Outdoor kitchen
Outdoor kitchen

Filip Michalowski

Pool
Pool

Filip Michalowski

New flourishes include an opened-up kitchen, updated living areas, an expanded ground floor with media room, office, a bedroom suite, and an updated garage. In addition, the home is also now eco-friendly and features solar panels, radiant floor heating, as well as geothermal heating and cooling systems.

Rudolph was a renowned architect who chaired the Yale University’s Department of Architecture and is perhaps best known for his design for the Yale Art and Architecture Building.   

He was involved in the home’s expansion after his friends and clients,  Maurits and Claire Edersheim, purchased the property as their country house.

Rudolph made multiple additions and enhancements for them during the 1980s and early 1990s. Rudolph died in 1997 at the age of 78.

The current owners tapped the architect Michael Grogan for a respectful modernization, while retaining and restoring the Rudolph plans. What began as a master bedroom refresh and updates to the kitchen turned into a multiyear, full house overhaul. 

“Every bit of modern technology has all been incorporated into this midcentury creation,” says McLoughlin. “It’s the most divine house I’ve ever seen,” she adds.

It’s hard to disagree once you’ve seen the indoor pool, sunken living room, and master bathroom. The master suite now features a 21-jet tub, steam shower, rain/body showers, dual water closets, towel warmers, a vanity/dressing area, and attached closets.

The layout includes seven bedrooms and 7.5 bathrooms spread across a massive 9,000-square-foot interior.

The compound includes space to enjoy the outdoors, with a large screened-in and covered porch with an outdoor kitchen.

The combination of the acreage in Westchester County, in addition to the architecturally significant design, make this home a unique find.

“You’re hard-pressed to find 2.5 acres in Westchester,” McLoughlin says. Plus, “It’s five minutes from the town.” 

It’s also just minutes to the train and schools. She adds that it’s the best of all possible options.

“A luxurious compound and a stone’s throw from everything.”

The next owner can enjoy the brilliantly designed glass-and-wood architectural, without needing to lift a finger.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *